Fairly Wicked Tales, edited by Stacey Turner – Table of Contents, Ordering Info, Excerpts, Guest Blog/Interview Links, and Reviews

Fairly Wicked Tales“Once upon a scream…

“Think you know the real story behind those fables and fairy tales you read as a child? Stories are written from the viewpoint of the heroes, but the lines between hero and villain, good and evil, are often blurred.

“We’ve gathered twenty three tales that turn those stories you think you know on their heads by letting the villains have their say. What if Snow White wasn’t as pure as the newly driven snow? What if Red Riding Hood was far more dangerous than the Big Bad Wolf? What if Rapunzel was hell bent on revenge? Forget Disney, forget the Brothers Grimm, say hello to Fairly Wicked Tales—re-imaginings of both fairy tales and fables.

“Fairly Wicked Tales, a book for adults who harbor the wicked child within.”

(Click on the cover art by Shawn T. King to see it in full-sized wicked beauty!)

Fairly Wicked Tales, edited by Stacey Turner, is an anthology of dark fantasy and horror originally published August 6th, 2014, by Angelic Knight Press (later reissued on April 21st, 2015 by Ragnarok Publications’ Angelic Knight Press imprint), and includes my horror short story Sweetheart, the Dream is Not Ended (a reimagining of the lesser-known Grimm fairly tale “The Robber Bridegroom”). On this page I’m collecting links to things such as where it’s available to buy (both as e-books and in print), links to interviews and guest blogs, and other related stuff.


Where to Buy Fairly Wicked Tales

Amazon.com for Kindle and in Print



“The newest anthology from Angelic Knight Press is just shy of perfection…” — Frank Michael Serrington

“If you like exploring the darkest avenues of human – and nonhuman – behavior, get hold of this collection and I can promise you will be entertained and titillated to the darkest depths of your desires.” — Edea Pitre Baldwin, Amazon.com review


Table of Contents

“Song of Bones” by Vekah McKeown: A retelling of “The Singing Bone”.

“Red” by Katie Young: A retelling of “Little Red Riding Hood”.

“Sweetheart, the Dream is Not Ended” by Gary W. Olson: A reimagining of “The Robber Bridegroom”.

“Crumbs” by Adam Millard: A retelling of “The Crumbs on the Table”.

“A Thrice Spun Tale” by Suzi M: A retelling of “The Three Spinners”.

“His Heart’s Desire” by Fay Lee: A retelling of “Sleeping Beauty”.

“Little Beauty” by Matthew Hughes: A retelling of “Beauty and the Beast”.

“Hare’s Tale” by Jay Wilburn: A retelling of “The Tortoise and the Hare”.

“The Golden Goose” by Robert Holt: A retelling.

“A Prick of the Quill” by Lizz-Ayn Shaarawi: A retelling of “Hans My Hedgehog”.

“Sacrificed” by Laura Snapp: A reimagining of “Snow White”.

“The Glass Coffin” by D R Cartwright: A retelling of “The Glass Coffin”.

“The Price of the Sea” by David R. Matteri: A retelling of “The Little Mermaid”.

“A Blue Light Turned Black” by Wilson Geiger: A retelling of “The Blue Light”.

“Let Down Your Hair” by Eugenia Rose: A retelling of “Rapunzel”.

“The Wolf Who Cried Boy” by Armand Rosamilia: A retelling of “The Boy Who Cried Wolf”.

“It Comes At Night” by JP Behrens: A reimagining of “The Billy Goats Gruff”.

“Bloodily Ever After” by Reece A.A. Barnard: A retelling of several fairy tales.

“Al-Adrian and the Magic Lamp” by Tais Teng: A retelling of “The Arabian Nights”.

“The Fisherman and His Wife” by Bennie L. Newsome: A retelling of the story “The Fisherman and His Wife.”

“Rum’s Daughter” by T. Eric Bakutis: A retelling of “Rumplestiltskin”.

“The Ash Maid’s Revenge” by Konstantine Paradias: A retelling of “Cinderella”.

“Gingerbread” by Hal Bodner: What happened afer “Hansel and Gretel”.